Young people are trained to dance, not to teach: Leela Samson

Leelasamson


Well-trained teachers are not to be found even in major dance institutions, says Leela Samson


Leela Samson, eminent Bharatanatyam dancer, choreographer, and the former chairperson of Central Board of Film Certification, has some candid views on the arts education scenario in India. “The arts education in our country is generally poor,” Leela Samson says in an interview with The Education Post.

How do you look at the current status of arts education in the country?

The arts education in our country is generally poor. In the school system it is offered as a subject by the CBSE. However the teaching is poor, if not non-existent. At the college level it is offered in a few Universities. But the BA & MA degrees offered do not bring out good practitioners, or scholars of merit, or well trained teachers.

Are you satisfied with our approach towards arts education?

No. I don’t think the Indian education system provides special attention to the arts education. We have miles to go in this sector.

The opportunities and challenges in Indian classical dance forms.

Well-trained teachers are not to be found even in major dance institutions.

It may be argued that this is the case in most other subjects. Young people are trained to dance, not to teach. When the shows don’t happen, they start taking classes. This does not mean that they are gifted teachers.

Your suggestions to improve the quality of dance education.

Proper training programmes for teachers, with Child Psychology, Physiology, Injury Prevention, practical training & a study of theory, Vedic study, body training, literature & music study will bring out well trained teachers.

Education Post